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illkim:

When you use your ID at the club for the first time

image

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shittyreiko:

Blushing Amethyst and Bad Pearl is the new ship. Come on, guys? You know you love it

shittyreiko:

Blushing Amethyst and Bad Pearl is the new ship. Come on, guys? You know you love it

pyrrhiccomedy:

moniquill:

accioharo:

blackandyellowdoodles:

justacynicalirishman:

babyshibe:

doctorgaylove:

thecoppercow:

That Mysterious “S” Thing We Used to Draw (by the1janitor)

We used to draw this as kids and it’s always confused me. It still really bothers me tbh.

This is really creepy tbh.

yeah we used to draw these! around 2002. at the time i was told it was like the slipknot logo but now i know it’s totally not. but we did used to get in trouble for drawing them.

we never got in trouble with them. I had them all over my school planner lol. 

(We did call them ‘super S’) 

There’s this awesome book I read called ‘The People in the Playground’ which concerns the observations of an anthropologist on children’s folklore: the stuff that kids independently teach one another in school yards and playgrounds that has no real connection to adult lore and media. This is a great example of it, as are hand clapping and jump rope verses.


If you can finish the lines “Miss Mary Mack Mack Mack all dressed in black black black…” or ‘Hinky Pinky Ponky, Daddy had a donkey…”or “Miss Suzy had a steamboat…” or “Engine Engine number nine…”

stop and think about where you learned them.


It probably wasn’t from an adult or out of a book or in any formal way. It was from another kid; someone a grade ahead of you or someone’s older sibling or something. Who learned it the same way.

This is CHILD lore. Sometimes a fad will come and go in a single age cohort, sometimes it’ll last for generations. It’s kind of awesome.

The idea of child lore and a distinct child culture is really interesting, especially when you consider that children have a few traditions that go back hundreds of years.

For example: did you ever play “Quaker’s meeting?” Quaker’s meeting has begun, no more laughter, no more fun…that dates back two centuries

And of course there’s “Ring around the rosie,” which goes all the way back to the time of the black plague.

Children pass these things down among themselves as part of a legacy they lack the context to fully understand; but you could say the same thing about most adult traditions. That unbroken chain of shared knowledge connects their play to the play of children from hundreds of years ago, without any adult input or encouragement.

That’s cool.

taikova:

all those visions of b3 finale!korra in the b4 trailer ;~;

taikova:

all those visions of b3 finale!korra in the b4 trailer ;~;

redsuns-n-orangemoons:

y’all, at some point, ignorance is a choice. racism is definitely a choice. and no amount of fact spittin is going to change a hateful heart.

those people have to want to change. so stop arguing with them. stop frustrating yourselves.

(Source: weavemunchers)

jubilatio:

i love steven universe soo oo o o much

aprildralle:

mquester:

I loved this scene so much. The actors play off this pairing as flirty and adorable in a way the characters really weren’t in the novels IMO. 

That said, when she said the line, “Girls see more blood than boys,” my husband was all confused and like, “What, warrior women, she means?”

So I just looked at him and started listing off, “Blood from their periods every month, maybe blood from sex, blood from childbirth, blood from tending and washing the wounded and dead…That’s been true for most of womankind all through history.”

And he got very, very quiet.

I’ve reblogged this before, but I’m reblogging again for the commentary because this little exchange is like a wink to the female audience that I really loved and I guarantee you that any woman who saw this would know exactly what she means. There are a pretty big chunk of men in the world who don’t think that “women’s work” or women’s bodies are worth knowing about. Also I think find it really amusing when he tries to pass off his ignorance with, “you’re different, you’re not like other women” and she immediately shuts that down.

(Source: victorianhooker)

knowledgeandlove:

videohall:

Husky dog performs her overly dramatic death trick.

I’ve wasted fifteen minutes of my life watching this 8 second long video. 

last-snowfall:

geardrops:

swanjolras:

out of all the aspects of millennial-bashing, i think the one that most confuses me is the “millennials all got trophies as a kid, so now they’re all self-centered narcissists” theory

like— kids are pretty smart, y’all. they can see that every kid on the team gets a trophy and is told they did a good job; they can also see that not every kid on the team deserves a trophy, and not everyone did do a good job

the logical conclusion to draw from this is not “i’m great and i deserve praise”— it’s “no matter how mediocre i am, people will still praise me to make me feel better, so i can’t trust any compliments or accolades i receive”

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

where did this whole “ugh millennials think their so-so work is super great” thing even come from it is a goddamn mystery

what fucking kills me is, yeah, maybe we got the trophies, but who gave them out

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

Which is pretty much what mental health practitioners observe happening.

It’s also what I observed happening as a singing teacher: the older kids literally would not believe a positive word I said until I had proved I would tell them they screwed up/had done badly/etc. I did so in as useful a way as possible (“So this passage. We really need to work on this passage. A lot. This passage is not good yet.”), but with almost every adolescent I taught I had to prove I would give them straight-up criticism before they would parse my praise as anything other than meaningless “the grownups always do this” noise.